Study Document

Peace Efforts of The American Friends Committee War Relief USA Research Paper

Pages:5 (1635 words)

Sources:5

Subject:History

Topic:Cold War

Document Type:Research Paper

Document:#43488948


How the Quakers Opposed the Detainment of Japanese Americans during WWII

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), the co-beneficiary of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1947, was established in Philadelphia by individuals from the Religious Society of Friends (i.e., the Quakers) in Spring 1917. The link between AFSC and the Religious Society of Friends was always tenuous, as the activism of the organization was something universal that many non-Quakers around the world could celebrate, while the actual tenets of Quakerism were not nearly as popular as the peace movement that the Religious Society of Friends took part in. Initially, the goals of the committee were limited; however, over the 20th century, the AFSC embraced pacifism and began taking part in the fight for peace (Ingle, 2016). The AFSC essentially helped to support and come to the aid of the victims of war, whether they were Jewish, Russian, European, African, etc. (Frost, 1992). This paper will discuss the background of the organization and show that the Nobel Committee awarded them the Peace Prize because at a time when nations were bombing one another into oblivion the Quaker-led organization was a reminder to the world that humanity is like a rare earth mineral that is worth more than all the gold, palladium, silver and platinum: the basic support the AFSC gave—such as shelter and food supplies—to people impacted by the war and its opposition to the detainment of Japanese-Americans in concentration camps in the US following the bombing of Pearl Harbor showed that the organization was indifferent to the type of prejudices and biases motivating other groups to fight and kill one another. Thus, the Quaker-led AFSC was a reminder to the world that it could do better—and that is why it was honored by the Nobel Committee.

The AFSC is a global social justice association with a mission that has its foundation in the moral philosophy of the Quaker religion. Its peace activism was based on their religious beliefs manifested in their public life since the founding of Pennsylvania by William Penn as a colony offering Quakers refuge. Like their British co-religionists, the Quakers started working for man by doing good deeds and seeking God's love. Established after the United States entered World War I, the AFSC at first acted to support principled conscientious objectors to war by facilitating elective help for youthful Quaker men who sincerely believed they could not serve in the military in the wake of being drafted under the Selective Service Act. These efforts ended up helping more than 600 Quakers and other radical volunteers (Ingles, 1992). Having engaged the Government to be permitted to embrace compassionate work as a choice to war administration, they were allowed the chance to aid in the rebuilding of France. The AFSC supported alleviation and recreation activities that served poor, war-torn nations. For instance, it provided lodging for dislodged people along the Western Front in France under the sponsorship of the American Red Cross. The Quakers were very active in providing aid to the sick and pregnant. They helped people…

Some parts of this document are missing

Click here to view full document

…addressing them head on and was not going to act as though they did not exist: its 1955 pamphlet Speak Truth to Power illustrates that (Mechling & Mechling, 1992). The AFSC was culturally competent and understood how to promote the idea of peace at a time when American culture was being inundated with a war mentality.

Thus what distinguishes this group as a peacemaker is its constancy and consistency in terms of commitment to the peace movement and its actions, which were deserving of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1947. It showed heart, compassion and commitment to the cause at a time when all other nations were doing their best to destroy one another. There are many other ways in which the AFSC showed its worthiness of the Peace Prize as well—for instance, at the start of the U.S. association in the First World War.

The AFSC served the peace movement all throughout the 20th century, beginning with WWI. The activities of the AFSC are mainly a testament to the organization’s commitment to helping the oppressed and the victims of war, whether they are Jew, African, American, Slav or other. The organization has moved on, however, from being a specifically Quaker organization, though it does still profess Quaker values. It is much more pluralistic in terms of who runs it and how it operates. The work of the AFSC shows that for all the struggles it has seen, what with constant war throughout the century, the message of the organization prevails in the example it…


Sample Source(s) Used

References.

Franklin, S. (2020). American Friends Service Committee. Retrieved from https://www.mtsu.edu/first-amendment/article/1167/american-friends-service-committee

Frost, J. W. (1992). " Our Deeds Carry Our Message": The Early History of the American Friends Service Committee. Quaker History, 81(1), 1-51.

Ingle, H.L., (2016). "Truly Radical, Non-violent, Friendly Approaches": Challenges to the American Friends Service Committee. Quaker History 105(1), 1-21. DOI:10.1353/qkh.2016.0004.

Mechling, E. W., & Mechling, J. (1992). Hot pacifism and cold war: The American friends service committee's witness for peace in 1950s America. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 78(2), 173-196.

The Nobel Prize. (2020). American Friends Service Committee. Retrieved from https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/1947/friends-committee/facts/

Weir, A. (2014). Against Our Better Judgment. IN: CreateSpace.

Cite this Document

Join thousands of other students and "spark your studies."

Sign Up for FREE
Related Documents

Study Document

The American Friends and the Peace Movement

Pages: 8 (2337 words) Sources: 5 Subject: Government Document: #47374510

Introduction
The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), the co-beneficiary of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1947, was established in Philadelphia by individuals from the Religious Society of Friends (i.e., the Quakers) in Spring 1917. The link between AFSC and the Religious Society of Friends was always tenuous as the activism of the organization was something universal that many non-Quakers around the world could celebrate, while the actual tenets of Quakerism

Study Document

Women in the American Revolution Social Status

Pages: 20 (8769 words) Sources: 1+ Subject: Drama - World Document: #5396822

Women in the American Revolution Social Status of Women in the Revolution Molly Pitcher - the real story Evidence supporting her existence Evidence denying her existence An American Icon Other Women who took up Arms Women as Spies Ann Bates Miss Jenny Life as a Camp Follower Women in Supporting Roles The winds of Equality Abigail Adams Patriotism Men's views on Women in the Revolution Women as a Symbol of the Comforts of Home Women in the American Revolution played a deciding factor in the success of

Study Document

Jewish-American Experience and the Yiddish Radio Project

Pages: 7 (2637 words) Subject: Family and Marriage Document: #34489046

Jewish-American Experience and the Yiddish Radio Project The Jewish-American Culture in Yiddish Oral history has become one of the most important historical movements of the last two centuries. Through oral histories in either interview or preservation of recordings that were produced in earlier times, the history of the modern era is being retold and saved. Yiddish is a dying language the last of the Yiddish speakers are being lost and a small

Study Document

Challenges Facing Christian Missionaries in Post-Gulf War Iraq

Pages: 15 (4848 words) Sources: 6 Subject: History - Israel Document: #75448554

Unreached People Group Project (Iraq) Language Culture Economy Religion Family A Survey of Mission Work History of Mission Work Current Status of the Church Number of Known Believers Challenges Present Strategies Unreached People Group Project (Iraq) The history of Iraq parallels the antiquity of mankind; therefore, a more recent examination of Iraq's history will be more suitable for evaluating the needs of unreached people in this country. The country used to be part of the Ottoman Empire but Britain occupied Iraq during World

Study Document

Illegal Immigration It Has Been

Pages: 36 (9456 words) Sources: 30 Subject: American History Document: #65024425

8% of U.S. households were headed by an immigrant and received 6.7% of all cash benefits; by 1990, 8.4% of households were headed by an immigrant and received 13.1% of all cash benefits (Borjas, 1995, pp. 44-46). Immigrants in different categories (both legal and illegal) have been eligible to receive certain welfare benefits. Legal immigrants are eligible after three to five years of residence, though asylum applicants and refugees are eligible

Join thousands of other students and

"spark your studies".