Wmds Essays (Examples)

Study Document

Weapons Of Mass Destruction WMD Antifa

Pages: 13 (3787 words) Sources: 12 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:67320498

...Wmds Weapons of Mass Destruction
1
An electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) attack could crash the American economy and bring virtually every industry to a standstill—such is the reliance of modern business upon the digital infrastructure. Thus, considering an EMP attack is something that government should take very seriously. As more and more of the world becomes dependent upon cyber infrastructure for the maintenance of other systems, the complexity of the security services of a country grows and intensifies. Is it possible therefore that there is an overreliance upon technology and that this overreliance can actually compromise a country’s progress and increase its risk of falling into ruin should a sudden attack like an EMP attack hit where it hurts most? Absolutely—and both state and non-state actors know that, which is why either one could conduct a high altitude EMP attack upon the US. The consequences would be devastating.
Non-state actors are just……

References

References

Chatfield, A. T., Reddick, C. G., & Brajawidagda, U. (2015, May). Tweeting propaganda, radicalization and recruitment: Islamic state supporters multi-sided twitter networks. In Proceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research (pp. 239-249).

Christenson, G. (2015). CBRN response. National Guard Bureau.

Freberg, K., Graham, K., McGaughey, K., & Freberg, L. A. (2011). Who are the social media influencers? A study of public perceptions of personality. Public Relations Review, 37(1), 90-92.

Garellek, A. (2016, March 4). The ISIS WMD Threat. The Cipher Brief. Retrieved from  https://www.thecipherbrief.com/article/middle-east/isis-wmd-threat 

Jennings, P. (2006). Miami port poses serious risks. Retrieved from  https://abcnews.go.com/WNT/story?id=131634&page=1 

Johnston, W.R. (2016, November 30). Summary of historical attacks using chemical or biological weapons. The Johnston Archive. Retrieved from  http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/terrorism/chembioattacks.html 

Klein, A. (2019). From Twitter to Charlottesville: Analyzing the Fighting Words Between the Alt-Right and Antifa. International Journal of Communication, 13, 22.

Maras, M-H. (2014). Transnational Security. Florida: CRC Press.

Study Document

FBI Drugs And WMDs

Pages: 11 (3378 words) Sources: 13 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:66505511

Introduction
The USS Cole Bombing in October 2000 was a prelude to the intense focus on the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) that the FBI took up in earnest one year later in the wake of and in response to 9/11. With the killing of … important factor in the development of a new counterproliferation strategy that would inevitably become the plan to stop the spread and usage of WMDs by terrorists against America. As the primary research question of this study is “In what ways can the nonproliferation regime connect and collaborate … sources that can help to answer that question, including covert operations that the FBI has engaged in to help prevent the proliferation of WMDs throughout the world. [2: Joseph Chinyong Liow, "The Mahathir administration's war against Islamic militancy: operational and ideological challenges." Australian Journal of International Affairs 58, no. … 2 (2004), 242.]
Literature Review
The……

References

Bibliography

Arnold, Aaron and Daniel Salisbury, “The Long Arm,” Belfer Center, 2019. https://www.belfercenter.org/publication/long-arm

Carter, Ashton B. "Overhauling counterproliferation." Technology in Society 26, no. 2-3 (2004): 257-269.

The Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. “Combating Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction,” Washington, D.C., 1999.

FBI. “COINTELPRO.”  https://vault.fbi.gov/cointel-pro 

FBI Counterproliferation Center. “About.”  https://www.fbi.gov/about/leadership-and-structure/national-security-branch/fbi-counterproliferation-center 

Fischer, Rowena Rege. “Guide to the Study of Intelligence: Counterproliferation,” Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies 21, no. 1 (Winter 2014-15), 78-82.

Liow, Joseph Chinyong. "The Mahathir administration's war against Islamic militancy: operational and ideological challenges." Australian Journal of International Affairs 58, no. 2 (2004): 241-256.

Manchikanti, Laxmaiah, Jaya Sanapati, Ramsin M. Benyamin, Sairam Atluri, Alan D. Kaye, and Joshua A. Hirsch. "Reframing the prevention strategies of the opioid crisis: focusing on prescription opioids, fentanyl, and heroin epidemic." Pain physician 21, no. 4 (2018): 309-326.

Study Document

Weapons Of Mass Destruction

Pages: 9 (2563 words) Sources: 10 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:76982977

Countering the Threat of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs)
Purpose Statement
Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons of mass destruction (WMD) area a threat that can completely disrupt an entire nation’s … of nations and regions, such as the Middle East, where Libya has become a failed state and the threat of the spread of WMDs is made worse because of the instability there now. Yet, even before Gaddafi’s overthrow, the state was seen as a rogue state by … state by Western powers (Hochman, 2006). In 2003, Gaddafi had signaled that he would be ending the development of the country’s stockpile of WMDs, which was why Western powers had considered Libya a threat to security. Gaddafi had always denied the nation was developing WMDs—but his turnabout in 2003 showed that he was now willing to seek rapprochement with the West. This led to private investment in Libya ………

References

References

Asada, M. (2008). Security Council Resolution 1540 to combat WMD terrorism: effectiveness and legitimacy in international legislation. Journal of Conflict & Security Law, 13(3), 303-332.

Carter, A. B. (2004). Overhauling counterproliferation. Technology in Society 26(2-3), 257-269.

CBS. (2011). Clinton on Qaddafi: We came, we saw, he died. Retrieved from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlz3-OzcExI 

The Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. (1999). Combating Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Washington, D.C.

Forest, J.J.F. (2012, Winter). Framework for Analyzing the Future Threat of WMD Terrorism. Journal of Strategic Security 5, 4. Retrieved from  http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1193&context=jss 

Hochman, D. (2006). Rehabilitating a rogue: Libya's WMD reversal and lessons for US policy. Parameters, 36(1), 63.

Lang, C. G. (1937). Archbishop's Appeal: Individual Will and Action; Guarding Personality. London Times, 28.

Stone, O., & Kuznick, P. (2013). The untold history of the United States. Simon and Schuster.

Study Document

The FBI Counterproliferation And Weapons Of Mass Destruction

Pages: 6 (1839 words) Sources: 8 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:33590628

...Wmds The FBI, Counterproliferation, and Weapons of Mass Destruction
The United States government significantly increased activities in programs involved in the protection of the nation and the world against weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in 2009 and 2010. The Obama Administration, in December 2009, gave a presidential policy directive aimed at countering biological threats with a focus on infectious illnesses whether such threats were manmade or natural. It was the second such directive the Administration had issued. The Quadrennial Defense Review in 2010 emphasized on how WMD’s proliferation was a threat to global security. In April of the same year, the Administration unclassified the Nuclear Posture Review for the first time and it was released alongside the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The treaty was aimed at lowering the number of deployable US and Russian weapons. Representatives drawn from all over the world met in May with a goal of renewing the……

References

References

Busch, Nathan, and Joyner, Daniel (ed). 2009. “Introduction: Nonproliferation at a Crossroads.” In Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Future of Nonproliferation Policy. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press.

Reiss, Mitchell. 2009. “Foreword.” In Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Future of Nonproliferation Policy. Edited by Nathan Busch, and Daniel Joyner. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia Press.

Cameron, Gavin, Pate, Jason & Vogel, Kathleen. (2001). “Planting Fear: How Real is the Threat of Agricultural Terrorism?” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, 57(5), 38-44.

Jennings, Elain. 2013. U. S. proliferation policy and the campaign against transnational terror: Linking the U.S. non-proliferation regime to homeland security efforts. Master’s Thesis. Naval Postgraduate School.

Levi, Michael. 2009. “On Nuclear Terrorism.” Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Mauroni, Albert. J. 2010. “A Counter-WMD Strategy for the Future.” Parameters, 58-73.

Ogilvie-White, Tanya. 2008. “Facilitating Implementation of Resolution 1540 in South- East Asia, and the South Pacific.” In Implementing Resolution 1540: The Role of Regional Organizations. Edited by Lawrence Scheinman. New York: United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research.

Pilat Joseph F. 2009. “Dealing with Proliferation and Terrorism.” In Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Future of International Nonproliferation Policy, edited by Nathan E. Busch and Daniel H. Joyner. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press.

Study Document

The Ethics Of Clandestine Operations

Pages: 11 (3151 words) Sources: 14 Document Type:literature review Document #:69864024

...Wmds Ethics of Clandestine Intelligence Operations
Introduction
One of the most common yet least understood methods of operations in the art of statecraft is the clandestine operation (Sheldon 1997). Though popularized in pulp fiction and film, such as the James Bond series franchise and numerous other spy thrillers, clandestine operations remain relatively unknown in the public consciousness—and when they are discussed it is generally with distaste, distrust and vilification (Sheldon 1997). Yet as Sheldon (1997) shows, clandestine operations are not new or unique to the modern world and in fact ancient Rome used them whenever military operations were impractical. Thus, “political influence operations, seeding, propaganda, political patronage, safe havens, political assassination, and paramilitary operations” can all be traced back more or less to similar operations implemented by the ancient Romans (Sheldon 1997, 299). Today, there are many different facets to clandestine operations, and many agencies that use them—from the CIA to……

References

Bibliography

Arnold, A. and D. Salisbury. The Long Arm, 2019. Retrieved from https://www.belfercenter.org/publication/long-arm

Barker, Michael J. \\\\\\"Democracy or polyarchy? US-funded media developments in Afghanistan and Iraq post 9/11.\\\\\\" Media, Culture & Society 30, no. 1 (2008): 109-130.

Best, Richard A. Intelligence to Counter Terrorism: Issues for Congress. Congressional Research Service: CRS Report for Congress, 2002.

Carter, Ashton B. \\\\\\"Overhauling counterproliferation.\\\\\\" Technology in Society 26, no. 2-3

(2004): 257-269.

Crumpton, Henry A. The art of intelligence: lessons from a life in the CIA\\\\\\'s clandestine service. Penguin, 2013.

Hersh, Seymour. Selective Intelligence. The New Yorker, 2003.  http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/05/12/selective-intelligence 

McCormick, G. H., & Owen, G. “Security and coordination in a clandestine organization.” Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 31, no. 6-7 (2000), 175-192.

Study Document

Domestic Terrorism And Extremist Groups

Pages: 13 (3981 words) Sources: 12 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:80039324

… create havoc on a large scale using small-arms weapons is readily available, there is no need to believe that weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) should be the main focus of counter-terrorist activity. Rather, individual extremists or lone wolves are fully capable of wreaking extreme violence on a ……

References

References

Barnett, B. A. (2015). 20 Years Later: A Look Back at the Unabomber Manifesto.  Perspectives on Terrorism, 9(6), 60-71.

Beinart, P. (2017). The rise of the violent left. Retrieved from  https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/the-rise-of-the-violent-left/534192/ 

Chatfield, A. T., Reddick, C. G., & Brajawidagda, U. (2015, May). Tweeting propaganda, radicalization and recruitment: Islamic state supporters multi-sided twitter networks. In Proceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research (pp. 239-249).

Costello, M., & Hawdon, J. (2018). Who are the online extremists among us? Sociodemographic characteristics, social networking, and online experiences of those who produce online hate materials. Violence and gender, 5(1), 55-60.

DeCook, J. R. (2018). Memes and symbolic violence:# proudboys and the use of memes for propaganda and the construction of collective identity. Learning, Media and Technology, 43(4), 485-504.

Freberg, K., Graham, K., McGaughey, K., & Freberg, L. A. (2011). Who are the social media influencers? A study of public perceptions of personality. Public Relations Review, 37(1), 90-92.

Hamm, M &Spaaj, R. (2015). Lone wolf terrorism in America: Using knowledge of radicalization pathways to forge prevention strategies. U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved from  https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/248691.pdf 

Klein, A. (2019). From Twitter to Charlottesville: Analyzing the Fighting Words Between the Alt-Right and Antifa. International Journal of Communication, 13, 22.

 

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