Cherokee Essays (Examples)

Study Document

Indian Removal Act 1830

Pages: 13 (4034 words) Sources: 13 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:92871385

… Americans was not actually President Jackson’s idea. George Washington had proposed it, and other administrations had followed suit, forcibly removing the Choctaw and Cherokee from their native soil throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.[footnoteRef:2] Washington and Jefferson had promoted the idea of having the Indians adopt the … society[footnoteRef:5]—which is essentially what happened to most of the Native Americans following the Indian Removal Act of 1830—with the exception of a few Cherokee, who managed to maintain some semblance of their old way of life in the South, as shall be seen.[footnoteRef:6] [3: “The Magnetic Telegraph,” … differences in the political experiences of American blacks and white ethnics: Revisiting an unresolved controversy." Ethnic and Racial Studies 15, no. 1 (1992), 102.] [6: Cherokee Preservation Foundation. “About the Eastern Band.” http://cherokeepreservation.org/who-we-are/about-the-ebci/]
A
Need for “Progress”
The idea behind the Indian Removal Act was simple. It was basically viewed by the WASP leaders of……

References

Works Cited

Primary Sources

Crockett, Davy, “On the removal of the Cherokees, 1834,” Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. https://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-now/spotlight-primary-source/davy-crockett-removal-cherokees-1834

“The Magnetic Telegraph.” Ladies’ Repository 10(1850): 61-62. O’Sullivan, John. “Annexation.” United States Magazine and Democratic Review, vol.17, no. 1 (July-August 1845): 5-10.

Sevier, John. Letter to the Cherokee. DPLA.  https://dp.la/primary-source-sets/cherokee-removal-and-the-trail-of-tears/sources/1500 

Secondary Sources

Brown-Rice, Kathleen. "Examining the Theory of Historical Trauma Among Native Americans." Professional Counselor 3, no. 3 (2013).

Cave, Alfred A. "Abuse of power: Andrew Jackson and the Indian removal act of 1830." The Historian 65, no. 6 (2003): 1330-1353.

Cherokee Preservation Foundation. “About the Eastern Band.” Cherokee Preservation, 2010.  http://cherokeepreservation.org/who-we-are/about-the-ebci/

Study Document

Summer Sun Risin

Pages: 8 (2257 words) Sources: 7 Document Type:Book Review Document #:69181450

...Cherokee Book Analysis
African-American: SUMMER SUN RISIN'
W. Nikola-Lisa, Author, Don Tate, Illustrator, illus. By Don Tate. 2002.
An Afro-American lad helps his parents to work on their farm, rather leisurely as they enjoy the gradual movement of the sun to dusk. The family creates time for some fun after a long day's work on the farm, including hoeing, milking the cows, tending hedges, among other tasks in the simmering heat of the day's sun.
A summer day is captured by the artistic expression of verses in colloquial and paintings on paper texture. The expression on the characters' faces depicts contentment and confidence. The manipulation of the views may be rather disturbing, but the images will surely capture the audience. The full-bleed works of Tate portrayed advantageously in the horizontal view of the book's format, stretch the expanse of the plains one bit more by portraying the horizon as an unmistakable……

References

Works cited

Aziz-Raina, Seemi. \\\\\\\\\\\\"We are Grateful: Otsaliheliga.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Language Arts 97.2 (2019): 116-121.

Greene, Catherine. \\\\\\\\\\\\"My Papi Has a Motorcycle.\\\\\\\\\\\\" The Catholic Library World 90.2 (2019): 151-151.

Nikola-Lisa, W., and Don Tate. Summer sun risin\\\\\\\\\\\\'. Lee & Low Books, 2002.

Park, Linda Sue. Bee-bim bop!. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008.

Schiffer, Miriam B. Stella brings the family. Chronicle Books, 2015.

Seeger, Pete, and Paul DuBois Jacobs. The deaf musicians. GP Putnam\\\\\\\\\\\\'s Sons Books for Young Readers, 2006.

Soetoro-Ng, Maya. Ladder to the Moon. Candlewick Press, 2017.

Study Document

Principles Of American Democracy

Pages: 11 (3277 words) Sources: 5 Document Type:Essay Document #:49458393

...Cherokee Why American Democracy Has Failed and Why the Anti Federalists were Right
Introduction
The Declaration of Independence, written in 1776, asserted that “all men are created equal.”[endnoteRef:2] It was an Enlightenment notion: Thomas Paine, an avid follower of the Enlightenment Movement in Europe, had written the Rights of Man to support and promote the ideas of the philosophical revolution that had gotten underway decades prior with Rousseau’s Social Contract and the latter’s pursuit of naturalism in opposition to the Old World values, virtues and order.[endnoteRef:3] The problem that occurred in America was that the Founding Fathers were not of the same mind as Thomas Paine, though they readily used his words and ideas in their Declaration of Independence. Paine truly believed in the equality of all men and he was whole-heartedly opposed to the institution of slavery. The Founding Fathers were not, and the equality they expressed in the Declaration……

References

References

Declaration of Independence.  (1776).  Retrieved from  https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/declaration-transcript 

Rousseau, J.  (2018). Retrieved from  https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rousseau/ 

Van Voris, J. (1996). Carrie Chapman Catt: A Public Life. New York City: Feminist Press at CUNY.

Hunt, L. (2016). "Introduction: The Revolutionary Origins of Human Rights." In The French Revolution and Human Rights: A Brief History with Documents, 2nd Edition, edited by Lynn Hunt, 1-31 (Boston: Bedford), 1.

Hunt, L. (2016). "Introduction: The Revolutionary Origins of Human Rights." In The French Revolution and Human Rights: A Brief History with Documents, 2nd Edition, edited by Lynn Hunt, 1-31 (Boston: Bedford), 5.

National Assembly. “Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, 26 August 1789.” Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite.  http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/exhibits/show/liberty--equality--fraternity/item/3216 

Foote, S.  (1958).  The Civil War:  Ft. Sumter to Perryville.  NY:  Random House.

Brutus No. 1. (1787).   http://www.constitution.org/afp/brutus01.htm

Study Document

How Religious Beliefs Affected Colonial Social Structure In America

Pages: 6 (1917 words) Sources: 7 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:51981649

...Cherokee Colonial America was a diverse hodge-podge of religious communities. The Quakers had been given Pennsylvania by William Penn, whose father had held ties with the King of England (Fantel). The Puritans were in New England. Baptists established themselves in the South. Catholics had been in the Northern territories and in the Southwest well before the Protestant surge, and they also established the first Catholic state in Maryland—before it was later taken over by Protestants who banned Catholicism (Laux). In short, there was little religious unity broadly speaking, but religion nonetheless played an important role in the structuring of society and class when it came to local organization. Hawthorne and Melville—the two premier authors of the 19th century—described this experience of social stratification within a religious context fairly well. But there are numerous signs and examples of how it existed and persisted. This paper will show that religion was used as……

References

Works Cited

Fantel, Hans. William Penn: Apostle of Dissent. NY: William Morrow & Co., 1974.

Graham, Michael. "Posish Plots: Protestant Fears in Early Colonial Maryland, 1676-1689." The Catholic historical review 79.2 (1993): 197-216.

Holton, W. Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1999.

Laux, John. Church History. New York: Benziger Brothers, 1933.

Melville, Herman. Clarel.  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015005201424&view=1up&seq=9 

Milder, R. Herman Melville. New York: Columbia University Press,1988.

Pyle, Ralph E., and James D. Davidson. "The origins of religious stratification in colonial America." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 42.1 (2003): 57-75.

 

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