Intelligence Agencies Essays (Examples)

Study Document

US Customs And Border Protection And Defense Intelligence Agency

Pages: 4 (1149 words) Sources: 6 Document Type:question answer Document #:85676019

Private Security and Homeland Defense
Questions 2 and 3
Question 2:
The intelligence Community is comprised of 17 agencies. These agencies work with Federal, State, Local, Tribal and Territorial partners to protect the homeland. Four of these agencies are intelligence elements of the Department of Defense Services – Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. Please pick ONE of these Department of Defense … of the Department of Defense Services – Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force. Please pick ONE of these Department of Defense Services intelligence elements and explain its mission. In what ways does it contribute to the intelligence cycle? Provide examples.
The Department of Defense Services intelligence element that I selected in this particular case is the Defense intelligence Agency (DIA). The stated mission of DIA is “provide intelligence on foreign militaries to prevent and decisively win wars” (DIA, 2020). Thus, it is important to note,……

References

References

Customs and Border Protection – CBP (2020). About CBP. Retrieved from  https://www.cbp.gov/about 

Department of Homeland Security – DHD (2016). Section 559 Pilot Program Donations Acceptance. Retrieved from  https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/Customs%20and%20Border%20Protection%20-%20Section%20559%20Pilot%20Program%20Donations%20Acceptance%20-%20FY%202016.pdf 

Defense Intelligence Agency – DIA (2020). Strategy. Retrieved from  https://www.dia.mil/About/Strategy/ 

Keating, T.J. (2011). Joint and National Intelligence Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: DIANE Publishing.

Office of the Director of National Intelligence (2020). Defense Intelligence Agency. Retrieved from  https://www.intelligence.gov/index.php/how-the-ic-works/our-organizations/412-dia 

U.S. Government Accountability Office – GAO (2020). U.S. Ports of Entry: Update on CBP Public-Private Partnership Programs. Retrieved from  https://www.gao.gov/assets/710/704191.pdf 

Study Document

Intelligence Oversight Ethics

Pages: 11 (3311 words) Sources: 15 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:23829007



This literature review first looks at the history if intelligence oversight (IO) and then explains the current problem it faces in terms of ethics and the arrival of the Digital Age, which has … was established, which was to safeguard the privacy and rights of U.S. persons while enabling the Department of Defense to carry out its intelligence functions most effectively (Ford 2006, 721). The question that has always been at the forefront of IO, however, is the question of ethics. … however, is the question of ethics. As Goldman (2013) notes, as far back as 1929 this question of ethics and its role in intelligence gathering was addressed by Secretary of State Stimson, who made his views on the matter clear when he stated, “Gentlemen do not read … the matter clear when he stated, “Gentlemen do not read each others’ mail. Idealism aside, since antiquity virtually all major……

References

References

Bailey, Christopher and Susan M. Galich. “Codes of Ethics: The Intelligence Community.” International Journal of Intelligence Ethics 35.2 (2012), 77-99.

Brown, William F., and Americo R. Cinquegrana. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Warrantless Physical Searches for Foreign Intelligence Purposes: Executive Order 12,333 and the Fourth Amendment.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Cath. UL Rev. 35 (1985): 97.

Cantarella, Michele. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Intelligence ethics in the digital age.\\\\\\\\\\\\" (2016).

Congressional Research Service, “CIA Ethics Education: Background and Perspectives” (2018).

Ferrari, Rachel. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Moral Relativism and Dangerous Ethical Dilemmas in the US Intelligence Community.\\\\\\\\\\\\" (2018).

Ford, Christopher M. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Intelligence Demands in a Democratic State: Congressional Intelligence Oversight.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Tul. L. Rev. 81 (2006): 721.

Goldman, Jan. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Teaching About Intelligjence and Ethics.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Journal of US Intelligence Studies 20, no. 2 (2013): 79.

Hayes, Jonathan. \\\\\\\\\\\\"The Cinema of Oliver Stone: Art, Authorship and Activism by Ian

Study Document

Counterintelligence

Pages: 12 (3490 words) Sources: 6 Document Type:question answer Document #:11133529

… threats, or, economic threats.
Preventing and detecting insider threats is one of the core aspects of the ONCIX strategy. As a new premier intelligence and security agency in the U.S. government, ONCIX needs a strong understanding of how to identify and deter insider threats. According to its … whole-of-career concept that so as to analyze data and to identify anomalies that present themselves. Anomalies are reviewed to see if any foreign intelligence entity (FIE) nexuses are present. FIE activities are analyzed as well for the purpose of identifying patterns of behavior that correspond with an … present. FIE activities are analyzed as well for the purpose of identifying patterns of behavior that correspond with an insider threat.[footnoteRef:3] [2: National intelligence Strategy of the United States of America 2016 (Strategy), 4. https://www.dni.gov/files/NCSC/documents/Regulations/National_CI_Strategy_2016.pdf] [3: National intelligence Strategy of the United States of America 2016 (Strategy), 5. https://www.dni.gov/files/NCSC/documents/Regulations/National_CI_Strategy_2016.pdf]
Automation is another key……

References

Bibliography

Counter intelligence for National Security, CIA, 1993. https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/kent-csi/vol2no4/html/v02i4a10p_0001.htm

Johnston, David and James Risen, “U.S.had evidence of espionage,” New York Times, 2001. https://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/23/us/us-had-evidence-of-espionage-but-fbi-failed-to-inspect-itself.html

National Counterintelligence Strategy of the United States of America 2016 (Strategy).  https://www.dni.gov/files/NCSC/documents/Regulations/National_CI_Strategy_2016.pdf 

Prunckun, Hank. 2012. Counterintelligence Theory and Practice, Lanham: Rowman&Littlefield Publishers Inc. Read the following: Chapters 8 to 14, pages 131 to 217. Appendices A to D, pages 219 to 231.

Richelson, Jeffrey. 2007. “The Pentagon’s Counterspies: The Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA).” (September 17). National Security Archive. Accessed January 19, 2017.  http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB230/ .

Van Cleave, Michelle. “Strategic Counterintelligence: What Is It and What Should We Do About It ?” 2007. CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence. https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol51no2/strategic-counterintelligence.html

Study Document

Is Homegrown Terrorism A Real Threat In The US Chesser Report

Pages: 1 (342 words) Sources: 1 Document Type:Essay Document #:38450443

… Report are that I wonder how much of this story is actually true and whether Zachary Chesser isn’t rather an asset for the intelligence community. After all, his father was a US government contractor, and Chesser virtually grew up in the backyard of the intelligence community in Virginia. He attended George Mason for a semester and George Mason is heavily involved with the intelligence community. I find it hard to believe that a kid with this background would become radicalized by a teammate on a soccer club. … activist if not for the purpose of infiltration? I find that scenario much more plausible than the one presented in the report. The intelligence community regularly engages in infiltration exercises and develops false narratives for purposes related to covert operations. COINTELPRO showed the extent to which intelligence agencies will infiltrate radical organizations in the US, without regard for Constitutional law. To……

References

References

Majority and Minority Staff Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (2012). Zachary Chesser: A Case Study in Online Islamist Radicalization and Its Meaning for the Threat of Homegrown Terrorism.

 

Study Document

The Ethics Of Clandestine Operations

Pages: 11 (3151 words) Sources: 14 Document Type:literature review Document #:69864024

Ethics of Clandestine intelligence Operations
Introduction
One of the most common yet least understood methods of operations in the art of statecraft is the clandestine operation (Sheldon … less to similar operations implemented by the ancient Romans (Sheldon 1997, 299). Today, there are many different facets to clandestine operations, and many agencies that use them—from the CIA to the FBI to the NCS (the National Clandestine Service)—and those are just to name a few of … (the National Clandestine Service)—and those are just to name a few of the ones in the U.S. Every developed nation has their own agencies that implement clandestine operations as a normal part of statecraft. This literature review examines the role that clandestine operations play in the U.S. … clandestine operations play in the U.S. today and what the risks of those operations can be.
The Complexity of Clandestine Operations among Multiple agencies
A big……

References

Bibliography

Arnold, A. and D. Salisbury. The Long Arm, 2019. Retrieved from https://www.belfercenter.org/publication/long-arm

Barker, Michael J. \\\\\\"Democracy or polyarchy? US-funded media developments in Afghanistan and Iraq post 9/11.\\\\\\" Media, Culture & Society 30, no. 1 (2008): 109-130.

Best, Richard A. Intelligence to Counter Terrorism: Issues for Congress. Congressional Research Service: CRS Report for Congress, 2002.

Carter, Ashton B. \\\\\\"Overhauling counterproliferation.\\\\\\" Technology in Society 26, no. 2-3

(2004): 257-269.

Crumpton, Henry A. The art of intelligence: lessons from a life in the CIA\\\\\\'s clandestine service. Penguin, 2013.

Hersh, Seymour. Selective Intelligence. The New Yorker, 2003.  http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/05/12/selective-intelligence 

McCormick, G. H., & Owen, G. “Security and coordination in a clandestine organization.” Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 31, no. 6-7 (2000), 175-192.

Study Document

Homeland Defense And Private Security After September 11 Attacks

Pages: 6 (1861 words) Sources: 5 Document Type:Essay Document #:15174853

… the September 11 attacks, Americans had never experienced a large scale terrorist incident within their country’s borders. Moreover, most local and state security agencies had no experience with such attacks and were, therefore, very ill-prepared to respond to them. The only historic attacks or incidents that compare … national poll revealed that 73 percent of Americans agreed that the top priority for the then newly elected president should be to protect…[break]…in intelligence and cyber-security areas. Considering the heavy involvement of private sector actors in critical infrastructure protection, private actors can support the federal government in … federal government in the protection of critical infrastructure in several ways (Dugulin & Niglia, 2015).
First, private actors can act as advisers to government agencies and international agencies. There are many private sector consultancy firms that are directly involved in advising companies and agencies around the world that own or run critical infrastructures. They……

References

References

Chanley, V. (2002). Trust in Government in the Aftermath of 9/11: Determinants and Consequences. Political Psychology, 23(3), 469-483. Retrieved May 11, 2020, from https://www.jstor.org/stable/3792588

Dugulin, R., & Niglia, A. (2015, May 17). The private sector in the protection of critical infrastructure - GRI. Global Risk Insights. https://globalriskinsights.com/2015/05/the-private-sectors-vital-role-in-the-protection-of-critical-infrastructure/

Gramlich, J. (2018, September 11). Since 9/11, Americans have seen anti-terrorism policy as a top priority. Pew Research Center.  https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/09/11/defending-against-terrorism-has-remained-a-top-policy-priority-for-americans-since-9-11/ 

Morgan, D. (2019). Homeland Security Research and Development: Homeland Security Issues in the 116th Congress. Current Politics and Economics of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, 21(1), 43-46.

Moteff, J., Copeland, C., & Fischer, J. (2003, January). Critical infrastructures: What makes an infrastructure critical?. Library of Congress Washington DC Congressional Research Service.

Study Document

Angleton S Counterintelligence Program And What Went Wrong

Pages: 9 (2657 words) Sources: 8 Document Type:Essay Document #:36485484

intelligence Thesis Proposal
Abstract
This proposal describes the need for an ethical standard in intelligence. It discusses how an analysis of the formation of the intelligence program under Angleton can provide insight into what went wrong with intelligence and how those problems can be prevented in the future. It uses a combination of conflict theory, structural functionalism and critical theory to … can be prevented in the future. It uses a combination of conflict theory, structural functionalism and critical theory to explore the dimensions of intelligence in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The research design is qualitative with the case study approach to Angleton’s intelligence serving as the method. The aim of the research is to provide an ethical framework that could be used to help the intelligence enterprise collaborate more effectively with the private sector in the future.
Introduction
intelligence and intelligence operations have always been a part of……

References

Reference List

Bailey, Christopher and Susan M. Galich. “Codes of Ethics: The Intelligence Community.” International Journal of Intelligence Ethics 35.2 (2012), 77-99.

Bartos, C. and P. Wehr. 2002. Using conflict theory. UK: University of Cambridge.

Bellaby, Ross. "What's the Harm? The Ethics of Intelligence Collection." Intelligence and National Security 27, no. 1 (2012): 93-117.

Church Committee. “Final report of the Select committee to study governmental operations With respect to Intelligence activities United states senate Together with Additional, supplemental, and separate Views.” Intelligence.senate.gov, 1976. https://www.intelligence.senate.gov/sites/default/files/94755_I.pdf

Coyne, John, Peter Bell, and Shannon Merrington. "Exploring ethics in intelligence and the role of leadership." Interntional Journal of Business and Commerce 2, no. 10 (2013): 27-37.

Erskine, Toni. "'As Rays of Light to the Human Soul'? Moral Agents and Intelligence Gathering." Intelligence & National Security 19, no. 2 (2004): 359-381.

Nakashima, Ellen. “Top counterintelligence official challenges the private sector to step up defenses against foreign spying.” Washington Post, 2020.  https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/top-counterintelligence-official-challenges-the-private-sector-to-step-up-defenses-against-foreign-spying/2020/02/10/d842d83c-4c15-11ea-9b5c-eac5b16dafaa_story.html 

Pfaff, T., & Tiel, J. R. (2004). The ethics of espionage. Journal of Military Ethics, 3(1), 1-15.

Study Document

Cyber Espionage

Pages: 16 (4895 words) Sources: 24 Document Type:Case Study Document #:27491269

… state behavior while cyber attack is unacceptable. This study seeks to answer the question, “How is cyber espionage an acceptable state behavior for intelligence gathering though it potentially damages relations between nation-states?” The qualitative case study examined existing studies on this issue and employed thematic analysis to … since it plays a key role in cyber warfare, helps to establish appropriate countermeasures against cyberattacks and potential threats in cyberspace, and enhances intelligence gathering. While the study provides significant insights on this topic, future studies should examine the issue based on empirical or primary data.
Keywords: … on this topic, future studies should examine the issue based on empirical or primary data.
Keywords: cyber espionage, acceptability, state behavior, cyberattacks, relationship, intelligence gathering, national security, cyber warfare, cyber capabilities.
Introduction
Cyberspace has become an important element in the operations of any given country since we … to relations between states and……

References

Bibliography

Ablon, L. “Data Thieves: The Motivations of Cyber Threat Actors and Their Use and Monetization of Stolen Data.” RAND Corporation, March 2018.  https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/testimonies/CT400/CT490/RAND_CT490.pdf 

Agarwal A. & CERT-IN. “Cyber Espionage, Infiltration and Combating Techniques.” Indian Computer Emergency Response Team, 2013.  https://www.cert-in.org.in/Downloader?pageid=5&type=2&fileName=CIPS-2013-0128.pdf " target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">

Study Document

Cyber Espionage

Pages: 7 (2040 words) Sources: 5 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:12891464

… state behavior while cyber attack is unacceptable. This study seeks to answer the question, “How is cyber espionage an acceptable state behavior for intelligence gathering though it is a form of unacceptable cyberattack?” Background information to provide the context for this study is discussed as well as … as well as existing publications on recent cyber espionage activities by China and Russia.
Keywords: cyber espionage, acceptability, proposition, state behavior, cyberattack, relationship, intelligence gathering, national security.
Introduction
Cyberspace has become an important element ins the operations of any given country because of today’s information age. The … to relations between states and has become a complex international problem in the modern world. Cyber espionage is largely viewed as a new intelligence gathering approach and strategy for national security decisions. However, cyber espionage remains a form of cyberattack, which is legally and ethically unacceptable.
Research … espionage remains a form of……

References

Bibliography

Agarwal A. & CERT-IN. “Cyber Espionage, Infiltration and Combating Techniques.” Indian Computer Emergency Response Team, 2013.  https://www.cert-in.org.in/Downloader?pageid=5&type=2&fileName=CIPS-2013-0128.pdf " target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">

Study Document

Cyber Espionage

Pages: 6 (1662 words) Sources: 8 Document Type:Research Paper Document #:11946972

… state behavior while cyber attack is unacceptable. This study seeks to answer the question, “How is cyber espionage an acceptable state behavior for intelligence gathering though it is a form of unacceptable cyberattack?” Background information to provide the context for this study is discussed as well as … as well as existing publications on recent cyber espionage activities by China and Russia.
Keywords: cyber espionage, acceptability, proposition, state behavior, cyberattack, relationship, intelligence gathering, national security.
Introduction
Cyberspace has become an important element is the operations of any given country because of today’s information age. The ……

References

Bibliography

Agarwal A. & CERT-IN. “Cyber Espionage, Infiltration and Combating Techniques.” Indian Computer Emergency Response Team, 2013.  https://www.cert-in.org.in/Downloader?pageid=5&type=2&fileName=CIPS-2013-0128.pdf " target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">

Improve your studying and writing skills

We have over 150,000+ study documents to help you.

Join thousands of other students and

"spark your studies".