Feudalism Essays (Examples)

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The Impact Of The Black Death On European Society

Pages: 5 (1628 words) Sources: 4 Document Type:Term Paper Document #:21928849

… not discriminate between rich and poor. As a result, the poor and working classes organized to overthrow the centuries-old exploitative labor systems like feudalism. Because neither church nor state responded credibly to the Black Death, the epidemic weakened the authority of the Catholic Church and fostered populist ……

References

Works Cited

The Anonimalle Chronicle: The English Peasants’ Revolt (1381).

Boccaccio, Giovanni. The Decameron: The Plague Hits Florence. (ca. 1350).

Cohn, Samuel K. “The Black Death and the Burning of Jews.” Past & Present, Volume 196, Issue 1, August 2007, Pages 3–36,

Di Tura, Angelo. Sienese Chronicle (1348-1351).

Petrarca-Meister, The Social Order (ca. 1515).

Sloan AW. The Black Death in England. South African Medical Journal = Suid-afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Geneeskunde. 1981 Apr;59(18):646-650.

Study Document

The Modern World Of Autonomy Vs Heteronomy

Pages: 5 (1560 words) Sources: 8 Document Type:Essay Document #:86232532

...Feudalism Introduction
In the world today, information societies, all referred to as digital or postindustrial societies, are among the latest developments and are mainly founded on the generation of services and information. Information societies are powered by digital technology, and high-tech organizations like Microsoft, RIM, and Apple are its version of steel and railroad production companies. Given that the information societies’ economy is steered by knowledge, great power lies among those in control of the production, storage, and distribution of information (Steiner and Stewart, 527). Social classes are subdivided by peoples’ access to an education, because without any communication and technical skills, individuals part of an information society do not have any means to succeed.
Theoretical perspectives on modern society
Whereas several sociologists have conducted various research on social and society interactions, Max Weber and Karl Max established different theoretical strategies to assist us in understanding the development and growth of……

References

Works cited

Gerth, H. H., and C. Wright Mills. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Politics as a Vocation.\\\\\\\\\\\\" From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (1946): 77-128.

Little, William. “Chapter 4. Society and Modern Life.” Introduction to Sociology – 2nd Canadian Edition. (n.d.). Web.

Lumen Learning. “Theoretical Perspectives on Society.” Society and Social Interaction. (n.d.). Web.

Marx, Karl, and Friedrich Engels. \\\\\\\\\\\\"The Communist Manifesto.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Selected Works bu Karl Marx and Frederick Engels. Neu York: International Publishers 1363 (1848). 108-127.

Marx, Karl. \\\\\\\\\\\\"Economic and philosophical manuscripts.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Early writings 333 (1844) 75–112.

Marx, Karl. Grundrisse: Foundations of the critique of political economy. Penguin UK, 2005. 82-111.

Steiner, Pierre, and John Stewart. \\\\\\\\\\\\"From autonomy to heteronomy (and back): The enaction of social life.\\\\\\\\\\\\" Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8.4 (2009): 527.

Weber, Max. The protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism. New Introduction and Translation by Stephen Kalberg. ROXBURY PUBLISHING COMPANY, 2001. 13-37

 

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